Student projects

Below we list potential student projects in RSES, with links to relevant supervisors and research groups. For a list of topics, research groups, and research projects in RSES, please see the research projects page

Geophysics

Plate tectonics is the surface expression of a cooling Earth and convection in the Earth’s interior. Constraining the patterns of convective mantle flow is therefore important for understanding the dynamics of our planet and how the surface of the Earth evolves through time. Most of our inferences about mantle flow...
The Earth’s inner core is a planet within a planet: a hot sphere with a mass of one hundred quintillion tons of iron and nickel that lies about 5150 kilometres beneath our feet, still waiting to be discovered. Modern global seismology serves as an inverted telescope with which we can probe the Earth's deepest shell.

Palaeoenvironments

Magnetic minerals are almost ubiquitous in nature, which means magnetic techniques can be used to understand Earth’s magnetic field and deep-Earth dynamo processes, and act as proxies for system processes in palaeoclimate, paleoceanography, pollution tracing, and archaeology.
Research supports The group has funding to support one highly motivated PhD student, based on competition of applicants (academic background, research ideas, etc). Contact me if you are interested. We also welcome candidates who can raise fund (e.g., China Scholarship Council,...
Antarctic Coast Bathymetry in the region of Cape Darnley
This Geoscience Australia supported project is focused on a little known region of the East Antarctic coast, Cape Darnley. The aim is to assist with refining future coring locations using all previously collected Geoscience Australia geophysical data placed in context to recently reviewed bathymetric data.
“Lake George, an unsurpassed natural archive” is an ARC Linkage project, began in February 2015. The project is multidisciplinary, looking at the structural, sedimentological, hydrogeological, archaeological, and landscape evolution history...
Figure 1. The tropical waters around Indonesia are an important source region for Australia’s rainfall. The warm tropical waters around Indonesia are an important source of rainfall for Australia. When the temperature of the water in this area is warmer than usual Australia receives more rain...

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