A woman sitting on a boat writing on a piece of paper

Palaeoenvironments

The Palaeoenvironments Group specialise in environmental reconstruction on times scales that range from thousands to millions of years.

science Research area

About

The Palaeoenvironments Group is a collection of research scientists that specialise in environmental reconstruction on times scales that range from thousands to millions of years for both marine and terrestrial environments. These reconstructions extend the record of climate behaviour and variability beyond those observed in the modern, and provide insights on processes (e.g., the response of ice-sheets) that act on longer timescales.

We investigate cave precipitates, lake sediments, corals and reef sediments, marine sediments and ice cores to construct records of past environmental change. These records are invaluable for providing context for recent environmental change, as well as providing crucial data for ground-truthing climate models.

Currently projects include past changes in sea level, ocean temperature and carbonate chemistry, Antarctic climate, and Australian dust. We use a diverse range of proxies and have we have an array of (in house) cutting edge laboratories in which to make the measurements.

Projects

Project summary
Water resource management is one of the greatest challenges facing sustainable agriculture and urban populations across southern Australia. Key players driving catastrophic droughts in southern Australia are the tropical Indian Ocean Dipole and polar Southern Annual Mode climate systems,...

Atmospheric dust plumes can affect global climate, but the impact of Australian dust on climate is poorly known even though it is a major dust source. This project will study the magnetism of dust deposits in marine sediments to understand how Australian dust influences climate in order to better predict the...

The project aims to reconstruct deep water carbonate ion and nutrient contents at millennial timescales using high sedimentation cores from the Atlantic Ocean.

This research is part of an ARC Linkage project. Read more about it in this news story.
 

Magnetotactic bacteria biomineralise magnetic nanoparticles. They are ubiquitous in aquatic environments, so their inorganic remains (magnetofossils) should give rise to sedimentary palaeomagnetic signals. Ancient magnetofossil identifications were sparse until new techniques recently demonstrated their extensive...

Members

Researcher

Professor Nerilie Abram

Professor of Climate Science
FAA (Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science)

Emeritus Professor

Post-doctoral Fellow

Research Fellow

Honorary Associate Professor

Emeritus Professor

Emeritus Professor

Professor of Marine Carbon Cycle

Dr Xiang Zhao @ anu

Postdoc Fellow

Collaborator

Research Fellow

Research support officer

Palaeomagnetism Laboratory Scientific Officer

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Research Assistant

Research Officer

Student

PhD Candidate

PhD Candidate

PhD Candidate

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PhD Candidate

PhD Candidate

PhD Candidate

PhD Candidate

Visitor and affiliate

Honorary Assoc. Prof. (The Australian National University)
Honorary Professor (University of Queensland)